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Samuel Harrison House

82 Third St.; Pittsfield, MA 01201 | www.samuelharrison.org Reverend Samuel Harrison was a renowned 19th-century civil rights advocate, writer, and preacher in Pittsfield who served as chaplain to the legendary 54th Regiment in the Civil War, and successfully fought for equal pay for Union soldiers of color. His home is now a National Historic Landmark…

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St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church 1889, 67 East Street

St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church was rebuilt in 1889 on the church’s original site in order to open access up to Allen Street. To hold services, after the first church was razed and before the new one was completed, a wooden chapel was built on the rear lot. The new church was designed by Peabody and…

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St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church 1832-1889, 67 East Street

The first meeting to start the St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church was organized by Edward A. Newton on June 25, 1830 at Lemuel Pomeroy’s Coffee House. Newton was a former Christian missionary, President of the First Agricultural Bank, and trustee of Williams College.  Major Thomas Melville, Jr. was chosen chairman and Daniel D. Bush was chosen…

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Berkshire Medical Institute Boarding House, East of St. Stephen’s Church

In the 1820s, Dr. J.P Batchelder from Castleton, VT encouraged Pittsfield physician Henry Halsey Childs to open a medical school in Pittsfield. Dr. Childs, Dr. Asa Burbank of Lanesborough, and Dr. Daniels Collins of Lenox asked the Massachusetts Legislature for a charter and an endowment. On January 4, 1823, Governor Brooks signed the act, but…

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Town Hall 1832-1891 City Hall 1891-1968, 43 East Street

The Town Hall was built in 1832 at 43 East Street by Lemuel Pomeroy, a wealthy textile manufacturer. The building was a two-story plain brick building with offices on the second floor and vaults, containing records dating back to 1761 in the basement. The first floor had offices that were used by local men and…

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Pittsfield Center, East side of Park Square

The Pittsfield Center was home of the famous Pittsfield Elm tree for many years. The Pittsfield Elm was said to represent the city’s civic strength and natural bounty. During the American Revolutionary War, the elm served as a landmark for those looking for the small jail across the street at the current Patrick’s Pub. In…

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First Meeting House, 27 East Street

The First Meeting House was located at 27 East Street from 1764-1793. When the town’s growing population needed a larger gathering place, the town commissioned famed architect Thomas Bulfinch to design Bulfinch Church as an alternative. Before the long-awaited new building opened, the town passed the “Broken Window Bylaw” that stated, “Be it ordained by…

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Berkshire County Courthouse, 76 East Street

The Berkshire County’s Courthouse was built in 1871 on the former site of the Peace Party House at 76 East Street. The Massachusetts State Legislature approved the move from Lenox to Pittsfield in 1868 setting the stage for the construction of the Berkshire County Courthouse. The building was constructed from marble from a nearby quarry…

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Peace Party House, 76 East Street

The Peace Party House, site of a famous celebration of American independence, stood at 76 East Street from 1773-1869, immediately in front of where Berkshire Superior Courthouse stands today. The house was originally built for Col. James Easton, a hero of the capture of Fort Ticonderoga, but Easton’s financial difficulties enabled him to finish only…

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Bulfinch Church, 27 East Street

From 1793-1851 the Bulfinch Church was located at 27 East Street, the current site of the First Congregational Church. Charles Bulfinch, one of this nation’s first and most famous architects, designed the church that bore his name. He also, and more famously, designed the Massachusetts and Maine state house buildings, the University Hall at Harvard,…

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